99 Aztec Century - many worlds

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The final twist suggests that this was more of a many-worlds / alternate universe book rather than alternate history as such. Were you surprised? Did the twist work for you? How much difference is there between those two concepts?

Comments

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    As I mentioned elsewhere, this felt like an unnecessary intrusion into an otherwise fine book. But that said, the feeling of oppression at the very end - of being trapped in another world that was similar to, but clearly not, your own - was an interesting idea in and of itself. I felt Catherine's chill in thinking that she didn't know who to trust, or who was a spy, and kept looking for signs of Aztec infiltration. I liked it because if gave a nice tension to the very end. I'm not sure I found it believable, though.

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    I liked that the final location was not NOT our world. I had no problem with the many worlds at all. Perhaps the great leap the Aztecs made was this device, and at least some of their other advances were picked up from the other worlds. Perhaps not. Very cool in any case!

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    @clash_bowley said:
    I liked that the final location was not NOT our world. I had no problem with the many worlds at all. Perhaps the great leap the Aztecs made was this device, and at least some of their other advances were picked up from the other worlds. Perhaps not. Very cool in any case!

    Your comment sparked a memory of The Great Library in the game Civilisation, where you automatically pick up advances that other factions develop!

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    @Apocryphal said:
    As I mentioned elsewhere, this felt like an unnecessary intrusion into an otherwise fine book. But that said, the feeling of oppression at the very end - of being trapped in another world that was similar to, but clearly not, your own - was an interesting idea in and of itself. I felt Catherine's chill in thinking that she didn't know who to trust, or who was a spy, and kept looking for signs of Aztec infiltration. I liked it because if gave a nice tension to the very end. I'm not sure I found it believable, though.

    I particularly liked the way it resolved the description in slightly unexpected way in the prologue "alone with my ruined sister... the same Welsh valley where our story truly began, and yet not the same valley... the local man who brings our provisions... I mistrust him greatly"

    So many questions and teasers posed in a few short sentences, and neatly resolved as the ring structure closes at the end.

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    @RichardAbbott said:
    Your comment sparked a memory of The Great Library in the game Civilisation, where you automatically pick up advances that other factions develop!

    Ah! Yes! That is much what I was thinking!

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    No, I don’t like the portal to another world, as it did not fit with the rest of the book. I thought it was a cheap and ostentatious ending to what had up to the climax, been a good book. Anything could have been in those secret buildings, and it would have fit in just as well. We really worship Cthulhu. We perform alien autopsies here. Whatever.

    I overstate my case here, as I sometimes do. I do acknowledge that the portal does fit the theme of an expansionistic empire, and, as noted by others, ending the book in the “same” location as it began does work.

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