dr_mitch

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dr_mitch
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  • I'm happy with either. Since that's not a helpful response I'll vote for the comedy; we've had a few months in a row now of relatively heavy books.
  • The Flashman books I've read have been great. And another case of reusing a character from fiction and plenty of historical characters.
  • The Bronze God of Rhodes was immense fun. I've already mentioned Anno Dracula and League of Extraordinary Gentlemen for reusing fictional characters. Recently I read The Stress of Her Regard (Tim Powers) featuring Byron and Shelley as major characte…
  • In the One Ring, I've certainly had Thranduil, Elrond, the sons of Elrond, Radagast, and some of the Dwarves from the Hobbit appear - though I've not made use of more prominent characters from the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings stories. In one game, o…
  • I think the notion is progress rendering things rapidly obsolete (the Great Eastern itself), and the costs and cruelty of Empire (Nemo's story). There are other things I can think of that treat the 19th Century this way. The first I can think of act…
  • As I said in Q4, I was impressed with the historical detail, and the way the real world history of the ship was involved. And the details of the ship. I quite liked Nemo's awful past, and the idea of progress and shrinking of the world the cable acr…
  • I have to say, not really. But it was definitely clever. The climax with both Ahab and Nemo dying felt inevitable, albeit not in how it happened. The bit I liked best was the historic detail on the Great Eastern itself; I looked up the actual histor…
  • I'm not sure I can judge this as I've read neither 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea nor Moby Dick. To me, Ahab came across as thoroughly unpleasant and Nemo as (understandably) a zealot. I enjoyed Brunel's point of view the most. It's tempting to read t…
  • I think the concept was worthwhile in this case. There's other fun reimagining of concepts from existing fiction out there - for example Anno Dracula (Kim Newman), and League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (Alan Moore). And all sorts of RPGs based on ex…
  • Finished. It was interesting. I was expecting something quite pulpy and got something highly literary. Looking forward to the discussion.
  • I really need to reread The Other Wind. I remember finding it wonderful, but I've mostly forgotten it. Though we're likely to have a book club read of it at some point, so I might wait until then. The book of Earthsea short stories I have yet to rea…
  • Le Guin's Earthsea books are very different kettles of fish to Always Coming Home. I love Earthsea. Always Coming Home I'm pretty sure I didn't actually understand, let alone come to a decision whether I liked it or not.
  • More books read... * The Fall Of The West: The Death Of The Roman Superpower (Adrian Galsworthy). A history rather than fiction book, being an account of the Roman Empire from the emperor Commodus to the fall of the Western Empire. A broad narrati…
  • (Quote) I'm the anti-clash. ;)
  • I liked it a lot. It was a good story that gripped me, Mexico gave it an interesting flavour even it didn't go into things deeply (it paired nicely to the Mexican Revolution podcast I'm currently listening to). And I'm completely ignorant of Mayan r…
  • There's a lot in the book that's local. The Mayan gods and spirits only have power locally. The beliefs are only relevant locally. Casiopea's family is only powerful in one particular locale, and irrelevant outside of that (look at Martin in the wid…
  • I think the growth element is the main characters not being defined by their past situations, and growing beyond them. So Casiopea goes from servitude, through another form of servitude, to freedom. Hun-Kame is not bound by the cycle of vengeance. …
  • (Quote) Thanks. I guess the change aspect isn't what I want to especially emphasise - no more than character change isn't already embedded into most RPGs in any case. In crude terms, isn't the protagonist just rapidly earning experience points?
  • There are a lot of binaries, which is a definite theme - the main character and her cousin, the two death gods, the Hero Twins, the twin sorceres. An interesting thing is that things have "gone wrong" when these pairs are competing rather …
  • I love the Mayan underworld, and the theme of clashing gods drawing mortals into their dispute. There are definitely themes in common with Liminal (indeed the whole thing is very small l liminal). And the Mexican 1920s setting is also very cool - a…
  • I have finally finished, and it was absolutely amazing. I'll seek out more by the author. Now onto the questions!
  • Glad you're feeling better @WildCard . All that sounds...inconvenient. Yes, that's a good euphemism. I'll be with you when I'm finished which still isn't yet as I've got distracted. But soon.
  • I'm being slow with this one (and this whole month with reading in general - I've finished half a book, which is weird for me). So I'll join you later on when I have my mojo back.
  • > @NeilNjae said: > I think one thing is clear: the books work better when read at speed and you're caught up in the excitement of them. > I know what people's overall impression was in the slow read. I liked the books quite a bit las…
  • By the way, the first link doesn't work but I found it from the second.
  • There's not been an awful lot of general reading for me lately (I've got through quite a few RPG books, but they fall into a different category - my thread, my rules ;) ). But I have: * Auberon (James A. Corey). A novella that sits in between the…
  • Oh, and if you've not read The Dispossessed, stop what you're doing, and read it immediately. I mean it. Unless you're currently experiencing an emergency I suppose.
  • Always Coming Home is definitely all about the world building, and the main story is not much more than a longer version of the shorter stories given in the explicitly world building chapters. Where it's unusual is that it's world building with an a…
  • I'm in with the Great Eastern; it looks tremendous fun. Aside: The only club book I avoided because of price was Arkwright, which I could only find in a new hardback specially imported from the US, which worked out as about £30. Then again, judgi…
  • Interestingly, the second segment went far smoother for me - to the extent I happily read on and finished the book. The main story is a relatively small part of it. Related to the above point, the society seems a wholesale rejection of the "gr…