dr_mitch

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dr_mitch
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  • I'm in with the Great Eastern; it looks tremendous fun. Aside: The only club book I avoided because of price was Arkwright, which I could only find in a new hardback specially imported from the US, which worked out as about £30. Then again, judgi…
  • Interestingly, the second segment went far smoother for me - to the extent I happily read on and finished the book. The main story is a relatively small part of it. Related to the above point, the society seems a wholesale rejection of the "gr…
  • @WildCard (tagged to to make sure you're notified), I think I agree, though my academic training is neither in litarary criticism nor history. Karen Armstrong's work is academic, but doesn't read like a history book even when the subject is history.…
  • Honestly? I read Red Mars a few years ago, and enjoyed it enough to go on to read the rest of the trilogy. I don't know whether I would want to read it again, but I can remember enough to join in the conversation.
  • Okay, through the first installment of supplementary matter (the back of the book) after the first installment of Stone Telling. And there it seems things are in our future, presumably in California. With explains the mention of such things as &quo…
  • I'm struggling but persisting. Reading on Kindle might not be the best way. Most of what I've got so far is a series of impressions. The book might be beyond me, but I'm about 25% in and starting to enjoy it. The little invented folk stories are …
  • Good discussion everyone. I agree with clash with not liking the baggage of the assumption a group of characters travelling from place to place and doing quasi-legal jobs when they get there being the default RPG activity. To answer some of the thi…
  • Back on topic, I've now finished the Tekumel book. The flavour and structure of the world is interesting. There's lots of lovely things such as the three-tiered roads. The system is fine. It reads much better than the original TriStat system whic…
  • @NeilNjae if you would like a customised suggestion for you personally, I'll recommend Spire. PbtA-derived mechanics (with a tiny dash of Blades in the Dark) and really flavourful playbooks/character classes.
  • In my above list I forgot another recent game... Spire. Dark elf revolutionaries, trying to overthrow the oppressive rule of the High Elves in their tower city, Spire. It's a brutal lovely twisted setting, the best novel fantasy setting I've read in…
  • What do you get if you cross an elephant with a rhinocerous? ;) (Quote)
  • Okay, newish (last 10 years or so) sense of wonder original RPG settings I've read...ones that are original, not based on other properties, not historical, not new versions of old things, not focused storygames...a random selection. (1) Mindjammer.…
  • This out of print game has been on my "must find" list for a while (the other Tekumel books are very OSR, which typically isn't my thing, and Bethorm didn't suit me from a preview and reviews - clunky and little setting information, and I'…
  • Cool! And yes, I've only just seen this.
  • 20 - 21. Time to Depart, A Dying Light in Cordoba (Lindsey Davis) More Falco novels - about a hardboiled detective (or informer) in Rome under Vespasian. Good stuff. The first set in Rome itself, the second involving a trek to Spain. And the soapish…
  • Yes - I'm the same with mine. Simple Hangouts meeting, no other tech. Though some games I've played have used more sophisticated software. I'm happy to play those, but not so much with GMing.
  • I think @WildCard has nailed the flaw in the Culture. Most people seem reasonably fulfilled, but somehow in a shallow way. There are no deep relationships, no love - just casual friendships and equally casual sex. There is an incident of love and a…
    in Question 4 Comment by dr_mitch April 16
  • There is something very American about the Fifth Season. I think, concentrating on the oppression angle, racism takes different forms in the UK, and a lens that examines US racism doesn't necessarily work elsewhere. I recognise the US takes, but the…
  • > @clash_bowley said: > I am sure I will like it, @Apocryphal! How can I be a grognard if I don't grumble? :D Come now, you've liked two Book Club books in a row now!
  • I am capable of moving far too slowly for the eye to see.
    in Virtual Pub Comment by dr_mitch April 11
  • Seeing me is fairly likely.
    in Virtual Pub Comment by dr_mitch April 10
  • I feel like I've read relatively few books lately, but the numbers don't back that up, especially if I include a couple of things which aren't books, but took time to listen to, and did in my reading time. My thread, my rules. 15. The History of…
  • I'm sorry Richard. Sincere condolences - and at the same time congratulations on the grandchild. What a world.
    in Virtual Pub Comment by dr_mitch April 4
  • I think Grant has a definite personality - he's curious, analytical, geeky, affable, and a little sex obsessed. But most of these characteristics make him ideal as narrator. I'm not 100% sure he's completely convincing as a young person, in the sen…
  • Yes, there are definitely parallels with river spirits, though in Liminal they are particular instances of lords of the Fae. Generally in Britain there's a north-south divide, with the most powerful Fae being the Queen of Hyde Park and the Winter Ki…
    in 7. Gaming Comment by dr_mitch April 3
  • What appeals to me as a modern day supernatural setting is the supernatural elements having a strong sense of place, and drawing on that place's history and folklore. That's what I did in Liminal, with doses of invention, and that's what this book d…
    in 7. Gaming Comment by dr_mitch April 3
  • I think of the four plots (main investigation, Peter Grant's development, Thames turf War, Tyburn/Folly clash) there are maybe one too many. The Thames seems a vehicle to introduce characters for future novels. This was a reread, and I hadn't rememb…
  • I have a casual knowledge of London; I know it enough to recognise definite elements in the book. I will say that it absolutely bleeds London flavour (and more generally British flavour), and the super strong sense of place is something I love. The …
  • I was engaged (though it was a reread and I've read much of the rest of the series, so I obviously like that sort of thing). The police procedural elements seemed convincing to me, and reasonably informative. I like the characters. I like the use of…