dr_mitch

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dr_mitch
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  • The book didn't go where I thought it was going with any of the main characters. Sara looked like the main protagonist but in the end was more of an observer. She didn't really develop. I expected Moth to learn to see but lose her own abi…
  • For the Wasters, having no home and being outside time was both a strength and a weakness. For the people of the planet, blindness was both a weakness and a strength. Or reversing it, being able to see is both a strength and a weakness. Or acc…
  • The scientific camps remind a little of the warring scientific disciplines and grand unifier in Voyage of the Space Beagle. The book thankfully didn't go in that direction, though at one stage I feared it might. I did like the way the connectio…
  • Definitely intriguing.
  • The Rivers of London series was definitely one of the primary inspirations for Liminal. The other big one is Neil Gaiman. A big difference between Rivers and Liminal is that Liminal's not got a focus on one particular city or even cities in general …
  • I didn't know the author. I also enjoyed the book. The characters are nicely drawn, and feel real in how they act and react to events. It took a while to completely grip me, but I'd definitely read another by the same author.
  • Wolf of the Steppes is one I look forward to! The Amber Spyglass would be a good bet for a Christmas book.
  • Slow planning for slow read.
  • 6: Lies Sleeping (Ben Aaronovitch) The latest in the Rivers of London series about the magical side of modern day London. I love this series, and this book stays on the plateau of quality. It's less self-contained than some others in the series, co…
  • Sorry to go off radar here for a week; I was avoiding Dark Orbit spoilers. But I'm back, and ready to take up the reins again on the slow read.
  • Belatedly, hi Loz, Feral_Ink, and Evlyn. What a pleasant surprise!
  • 5: My latest is the Eighteenth Century, from the Oxford History of Europe series. It's non-fiction, and a collection of essays on different aspects of historical development in, unsurprisingly, 18th century Europe. I enjoyed the read. And I came awa…
  • The ones I've heard the most positivity about here are Dune and Moby Dick. Either seems to turn off some people, but those who are positive about each are really positive. I may go to a straight vote.
    in Slow Read Comment by dr_mitch January 31
  • Oh, I remember. I liked it. I recall a lot of people didn't get on at all with the writing style- and to be fair it does take a little getting used to. But it had the Knnn!
  • Downbelow Station gets the Dr.Mitch seal of approval. Though I ended up giving up on Cyteen.
  • The Expanse books are great fun. Dune would be fun to revisit as a regular read if we don't do the slow read with it. I remember absolutely *hating* Stranger in a Strange Land when I read it, but can't now remember why, so I'm willing. I …
  • Some commentary from me. I chose these because I judged they all have a certain depth and challenge which would make a slow read worthwhile, and give those of us taking part plenty to discuss. And to an extent, all are famous, which does make a diff…
    in Slow Read Comment by dr_mitch January 29
  • I'd happily host something later in the year, but nobody has liked the last couple I made everyone read! But some ideas in case you might learn to trust me again: The Caves of Steel (Isaac Asimov). An ancient classic Asimov novel. We've not done…
  • My word, this is marvellous! Thank-you so much Michael.
  • I think with these I'm trying to give my impressions rather than reviews. Maybe...though it's a thin line between the two.
  • I might be a little late to this discussion. I ordered a second-hand copy and it's not due to arrive until 30th Jan - 8th Feb. Oops.
  • 4: The Fifth Season (N.K. Jemisin) I was impressed with this. A fantasy novel which is original in its concepts, doesn't drown the reader with dull detail, and is genuinely good. A rarity for me, especially with more recent fantasy books. The con…
  • I like the classification. If it's a long book series, #2 is definitely the way to go for me. #3 doesn't satisfy me, and #1 leads to things being a huge investment, or ultimately unfinished. As for Suldrun's Garden...I think it's pretty much self…
  • 3: Trigger Warning (Neil Gaiman) It's a book of Neil Gaiman short stories. I read many of these in 2017, but I'll post it here as I finished the collection this week. As with Gaiman's other collections, there's a mixture in terms of theme and in …
  • I quite like 5 stars; with a rating out of 10, I struggle (for instance, I can't see the difference between 7 and 8 out of 10, or 2 and 3 out of 10, and it's hard to award 10 out of 10). But with 5 stars I can quickly fit something into how I fee…
  • 2: Cibola Burn (James S.A. Corey) Book four of the Expanse series. I'm not sure what to say about this... it's a space thriller, with some hardish SF trappings, good characters, and tropes from other genres. It was an extremely gripping read, and …
  • Weirdly, I found the read relatively relaxing. As @Apocryphal says, I could sit back, enjoy the ride and watch everything whoosh by without getting too analytical, and not try to read too much all at once; even a relatively small number of pages gav…
  • In RPG terms, being an actual magician is out of the hands of the player characters, apart from rituals, appeals to the fae, and magic items, which are just as likely to be taken away or be one-shots. Reading the book, it added to the fairy tale fee…