RichardAbbott

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RichardAbbott
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Games I like
Sundry, mostly board
Books I like
Science fiction, fantasy, some historical fiction

Comments

  • I'm sure that even in these covid-19 straightened days I can run to £10.50, and the pleasure of reading it with the club will vastly outweigh that. But as a matter of abstract principle, charging that much for an ebook feels wrong :)
  • > @Apocryphal said: > To everyone, > I have the July pick. I’ve already given it some thought and I’m leaning strongly toward The Great Eastern by Howard Rodman. Looks good though weirdly expensive, and apparently not on the second han…
  • > @NeilNjae said: > (Quote) > That's an interesting thought, but we've not seen anywhere in the Stillness for an Underground Railroad to transport people to. The US one moved slaves from where they were slaves to where they could live fre…
  • Another comment... Hi all, I was thinking today about these books during a long painting session at the pub (when we're finally allowed to reopen we shall be the smartest we've ever been :) ). In particular about the whole prejudice / lack of moral…
  • > @clash_bowley said: > Oh oh! "For fans on NK Jemesin?" THAT does not bode well! :o Perhaps I should have put that on my cover :o though said fans might be a tad disappointed at the end result
  • Hope you like it :)
  • At least things happened... I'm still not clear about the state of intelligence in this world (in the military sense, not the cleverness one). So far as I can tell, there seem to me multiple methods - these may be connected, but then again they may…
  • Oddly, my most-liked review on Goodreads is of Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing World, which dates from 1666...
  • Some thoughts on the syllabic metre used by Ursula LeGuin in some of the poems in "Poems, Second Section" ACH largely chooses syllabic metre (SM) for the poems in this section, made explicitly obvious in Four/Fives, and The Sun Going Sout…
  • (Quote) Of course the archetypal circular motion is the cycle of the seasons (as anciently conceived) and the modern equivalent, the orbital movement of the planet around the sun. Both of which are well-understood to be near-repetitions but not exac…
  • > @BarnerCobblewood said: > (Quote) > More like unstudied gazing at a picture than following a narrative? I don't think I'd put it like that... picture and narrative sort of go together in my mind. More like looking at something more l…
  • > @NeilNjae said: > (Quote) > Broadly true, but I think that reading both sections in parallel is informative, and perhaps even the intended way. There are snippets of worldbuilding information that appear in the "front" stories…
  • I have enjoyed the various short stories (romances, cautionary tales etc) a bit more but am still rather baffled by the whole thing, except as a personal project. My kindle says I am now 28% of the way through but I'm not quite sure how that compute…
  • Must be a US euphemism... I haven't come across it on this side of the pond...
  • > @NeilNjae said: > (Quote) > Is that because you're not enjoying the book, and want to get it over and done with? Is it because you're caught up in the action and keep turning the pages? Something else? > Sad to say that my readi…
  • Lots of violence in these chapters, both remembered and in-the-now. I find myself reading faster and skimming more, and it is becoming much more of an effort to slow down, read through at least twice, and dwell on the content. My reaction is to get …
  • > @WildCard said: > In our world, surely a mythic-literal embrace of a magical world(view) is a pre-critical stance, but in a world where magic is real and the Earth literally Is alive, what would that do to this three-part progression? It w…
  • > @WildCard said: > Regarding the science of this book, it bounced me into critical mode again by saying the stars are all wrong on the other side of the world. The stars are all wrong on the other side of the equator, which one can experienc…
  • > @Apocryphal said: > I also read it a few years ago. I think it stands well enough on its own. It’s a bit on the long side for a monthly pick, but we can extend the reading time if people want. I think Clash and Richard will love it, but the…
  • (Quote) Aha, thanks for the info! One of the more interesting parts of the interview with NK Jemisin that @NeilNjae posted about the other day (https://www.ttrpbc.com/discussion/436/interview-with-nk-jemisin) was when she described how she tried wri…
  • (Quote) I think that's a fair comment, but it is also at odds with the internal narrative device that the book is (as we have collected decided) largely dictated by Hoa to Essun. So (IMHO) the language ought to reflect what would paint pictures in E…
  • Essun's parenting - my guess is that she is simply displaying the "abused child become abusive parent" theme, which does make psychological sense. Kind of spooky (and weird from a story-telling mode) that it was never mentioned before that…
  • (Quote) I agree - NK Jemisin is either careless with these occasional "our-universe" words (as opposed to "in-universe" or else she uses this as a device to deliberately jolt the reader. Either way, it doesn't work for me. (Quot…
  • > @Apocryphal said: > .... In the read of the first section I wondered about the character of Pandora, to whom we are lightly introduced twice. Now, having encountered her again in the second section where she addresses the reader, I’m findin…
  • (Quote) @BarnerCobblewood oh I definitely intend sticking with it... these were just early impressions and I'd love for them to be transformed later on :)
  • Funnily enough I saw this interview as well and thought about posting a link :)
  • I'd have to say that, based on my very distant memory of Second Game, that Player of Games is the much more developed and intricate book!
  • > @Apocryphal said: > I think these characters were like this before the season. Jemisin gives us a clue in the next chapters (hint: we're approaching page 166). > Can you let us know when we get there... a page number doesn't mean an…
  • I have to admit to struggling with this, in a way that I had never expected to with Ursula Leguin. In terms of progress I am only 10% through according to my kindle, having just finished part one of Stone Telling and about to start the Serpentine Co…
  • > @NeilNjae said: > (Quote) > This has come up a few times before. Is the general consensus that Jemisin is good at physical description? People, places, action, what they look like and what happens? > To clarify my personal view.…