Hero Born Q6: Fight scenes

1

There are a good few major fight scenes in this book. What did you think of them? Were they engaging as the visual antics of martial arts cinema? Did you think the fights were well-described? Did the ornate names of the various moves add to or detract from the descrption? (Wild Goose Leaves the Flock, Returning Horse, Seagull Skims the Sea, Poison Snake Seeks the Cave) Did the fight scenes serve the story, advancing the plot and revealing character? How did they do that?

Comments

  • 0

    Loved the names, and the implication that the reader would be able to imagine the scene unfolding (of course I couldn't, but it didn't matter). It did remind me of the Tai Chi forms which (long ago) I dabbled in. For me the use of this terminology made the book and the fight scenes much richer.

    Some of them were probably a bit gratuitous (but the same is true of contemporary film/TV presentations of this genre) and came over a bit like "which of us can piss furthest" but they were a lot of fun and I didn't mind their inclusion.

  • 1
    While I loved the evocative style and move names, I found the fight scenes were relying on these rather too heavily and didn’t offer enough description to make them interesting. Also, the pacing seemed the same whether in a fight scene or not. So I was generally unmoved by them.
  • 1

    While I liked the names, I found that they did not help me visualise the moves of the fight, as much as the level of the fight and fighters. Like @Apocryphal I found the fights quite abstract, and so very stressful. I was also left wondering id they were tropes that an educated reader would be expected to know (like say the sound effects in Adam West's Batman), or if they were just made up on the spur of the moment.

  • 0
    > @BarnerCobblewood said:
    > While I liked the names, I found that they did not help me visualise the moves of the fight, as much as the level of the fight and fighters. Like @Apocryphal I found the fights quite abstract, and so very stressful. I was also left wondering id they were tropes that an educated reader would be expected to know (like say the sound effects in Adam West's Batman), or if they were just made up on the spur of the moment.

    That's an interesting thought... I had assumed, perhaps naively, that they were the proper names of real moves (maybe scaled up a bit for dramatic effect). But you are right, they could equally be plausible but totally made-up names. In which case the educated reader might enjoy the suitability of some invented move by comparison to real ones which they knew about.
  • 1

    @BarnerCobblewood said:
    While I liked the names, I found that they did not help me visualise the moves of the fight, as much as the level of the fight and fighters. Like @Apocryphal I found the fights quite abstract, and so very stressful. I was also left wondering id they were tropes that an educated reader would be expected to know (like say the sound effects in Adam West's Batman), or if they were just made up on the spur of the moment.

    I suspect the names are made up. Even if they weren't, I'm not sure readers would be expected to know all those moves, across many different styles, by name. And I think the names are rather too flowery to be "real". Back when I did a kung-fu adjacent martial art, we had moves like "Beautiful Lady", "Dragon Hand", and "Crane's Wing." Some were vague mnemomic, others less so.

Sign In or Register to comment.