98 - Final Harbor Question 6

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Many submarine novels are part of a series. This one is no different there, despite the ending. Homewood follows the USS Eelfish from the end of this book without a break in Silent Sea, though the story goes no further after that. Does that feel appropriate? Should this have just ended here? Or would you have to read it how he handles this?

Comments

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    Back in the dim, distant past of the 1980s, a friend lent me a series of novels about WWIII. IIRC, the books as a whole covered the progression of the war between NATO and Warsaw Pact, with different books covering different theatres. In that way, the books followed an ensemble of characters, using the wider war as the unifying frame.

    In other words, is entirely possible to continue a story even if most of the characters die. If Homewood was interested in selling the series, he could have told the story of several submarines. But I think he was more interested in making a point about war and that our heroes don't always survive. That's why he played against the "plot immunity" idea in the final combat.

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    @NeilNjae said:
    Back in the dim, distant past of the 1980s, a friend lent me a series of novels about WWIII. IIRC, the books as a whole covered the progression of the war between NATO and Warsaw Pact, with different books covering different theatres. In that way, the books followed an ensemble of characters, using the wider war as the unifying frame.

    In other words, is entirely possible to continue a story even if most of the characters die. If Homewood was interested in selling the series, he could have told the story of several submarines. But I think he was more interested in making a point about war and that our heroes don't always survive. That's why he played against the "plot immunity" idea in the final combat.

    Agreed in full.

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    Again the comparison with Douglas Reeman might be made - his 20th century naval fiction books do tell a composite story, but don't do so by following one group of characters, nor even one branch of the naval services (for example, one book is entirely about the little ultra-mini subs that were used to infiltrate enemy harbours and lay mines). In contrast, his Napoleonic-era books follow a definite set of characters all the way through. So I guess both modes work even for the same author.

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    @RichardAbbott said:
    Again the comparison with Douglas Reeman might be made - his 20th century naval fiction books do tell a composite story, but don't do so by following one group of characters, nor even one branch of the naval services (for example, one book is entirely about the little ultra-mini subs that were used to infiltrate enemy harbours and lay mines). In contrast, his Napoleonic-era books follow a definite set of characters all the way through. So I guess both modes work even for the same author.

    Interesting point! I am familiar with Reeman/Kent's works, and you are correct that you can get a composite view of the war from many different viewpoints with his Reeman stories.

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    Just like you can of a setting by looking at different islands. :D

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    @Apocryphal said:
    Just like you can of a setting by looking at different islands. :D

    ;)

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    Hmmm. Yeah. Islanders needs more submarines!

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    "Ensemble of characters." Yep. I bought the next two audiobooks because it was an enjoyable enough read. It's a tricky game for an author. He kept us from getting "too" attached to any character by moving them around, moving the viewpoint around, and killing off some of them. That is good in the sense that he can tell a broader story with more characters. It's risky in that I might get annoyed and put the book away, never reading the others, because I can't find a viewpoint character in which to immerse myself. Depends on the kind of reader and their maturity as to how they react.

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    edited April 7

    @Ray_Otus said:
    "Ensemble of characters." Yep. I bought the next two audiobooks because it was an enjoyable enough read. It's a tricky game for an author. He kept us from getting "too" attached to any character by moving them around, moving the viewpoint around, and killing off some of them. That is good in the sense that he can tell a broader story with more characters. It's risky in that I might get annoyed and put the book away, never reading the others, because I can't find a viewpoint character in which to immerse myself. Depends on the kind of reader and their maturity as to how they react.

    Maturity? I would just call it personal preference. I was curious how different people reacted to this deliberate lack of a single viewpoint character. I think since the 80s, there have been more and more movies and TV shows with a strong ensemble cast, which may make people more comfortable with this device.

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    > @Ray_Otus said:
    > Hmmm. Yeah. Islanders needs more submarines!

    In fact, it's a mystery why more isn't made of them! (Yes, I am hijacking this part of the thread for Islanders). If you really wanted to make a map of the islands, and you had submarines, surely you'd just drift round submerged, avoid all that nasty temporal vortex stuff that afflicts aircraft, and hey presto there's your map! OK, you don't have much of the interior of each island, but that's secondary, as you can clearly recruit the same people that the gazetteer writers did...
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    Yeah @clash_bowley -- maturity is probably the wrong word. I guess I mean media-experience. If you grow up on distributed viewpoint media, this would not be weird at all.

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    @Ray_Otus did you listen to the Corey M. Snow narration? I thought the reading itself was fine but his accents were truly awful.

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    @Apocryphal said:
    @Ray_Otus did you listen to the Corey M. Snow narration? I thought the reading itself was fine but his accents were truly awful.

    Tantor media, Corey M. Snow. Yup. I agree about the accents. LOL. Though overall, yes, the reading was good. His voice is pitched well; he just needs to dial back the dramatic quotient.

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