Mort Q4. Which RPG System?

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GURPS Discworld is, improbably, a thing, and was made with Pratchett's blessing (there's a lovely moment in the introduction where Phil Masters recounts beginning to start to explain RPGs to him, to be met with several AD&D war stories from the author) - what, er, other games would work for a game set in the Discworld, or in a similar style? What aspects of system help to create the game space?

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    Something like The Dying Earth RPG would certainly work. Discworld doesn't strike me as a fighty world, nor a world in which the grit and details particularly matter. But is is a setting where observation and dialogue really matter. So I think you want something to facilitate this.

    I've played 3 one-shots set in The Dying Earth using two different systems, and in each case the characters were given a list of pithy lines (many of them insults in Dying earth) that I assume are from the text. If they could wittily use one of these in a scene, the character got a bonus. That kind of thing would work quite well for Discworld, but rather than insults, I think you'd want witty observations and amusing niceties.

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    @Apocryphal said:
    I've played 3 one-shots set in The Dying Earth using two different systems, and in each case the characters were given a list of pithy lines (many of them insults in Dying earth) that I assume are from the text. If they could wittily use one of these in a scene, the character got a bonus. That kind of thing would work quite well for Discworld, but rather than insults, I think you'd want witty observations and amusing niceties.

    And a demonstrated ability to fit in to an improbable situation and turn it to your advantage :)

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    edited March 9

    I've not played Dying Earth and it's ages since I've read it. Something like Fate Accelerated could also work; that's a game where characters are described by their personality and relationships more than physical abilities.

    I would say Smallville could work, with its emphasis on Drives and Relationships, but I think the world of Mort is more tightly constrained than the ensembe-cast soap opera that Smallville aims for.

    If you wanted to emphasise people making others think them worthy, could Shooting the Moon work, reskinning the "romance" part for "respect"?

    I think a lot of Pratchett's novels are satires about something in particular, so you'd probably want to concentrate on the subject being satarised and build out from there. I don't think wandering murderhoboes fit into Discworld games (Cohen's a bit player).

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    @NeilNjae said:
    I think a lot of Pratchett's novels are satires about something in particular, so you'd probably want to concentrate on the subject being satarised and build out from there.

    What do you think Mort is about? I thought about this quite a bit before seeing your comment, and I can’t really come up with anything in particular. I’ve read only the Discworld novels in release order up through this one. I’ve read that as he progresses, Pratchett begins to make each novel about something in particular, but I haven’t seen that here.

    The book isn’t really about death or about coming of age.

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    @WildCard said:
    What do you think Mort is about? I thought about this quite a bit before seeing your comment, and I can’t really come up with anything in particular. I’ve read only the Discworld novels in release order up through this one. I’ve read that as he progresses, Pratchett begins to make each novel about something in particular, but I haven’t seen that here.

    Perhaps I'm projecting from his later books. You can imagine the thought process behind this book: "Death's a popular character, but I need a viewpoint character as a way in to the story, let's give Death an apprentice."

    Death goes through a fair bit of character change in the book as well. The book could be about duty and one's place in society, whether as a child becoming and adult, or an adult having a mid-life crisis.

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